?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Jan. 14th, 2018 @ 09:22 pm Map fun
Current Mood: curiouscurious

To give you a bit of a breather from all the anime reviews, here’s three articles about maps that I recently found, and that are very interesting to people who like cartography, language and technology.
Which lines of longitude and latitude pass through the most countries? An interesting read, with ample map diagrams to back things up.
How far ahead Google Maps is on Apple Maps, and how they achieved that. A thorough analysis of Google and Apple Maps, and some shrewd deductions on how Google has been combing (and combining) the data available to them to achieve their vast superiority in the online mapping space.
There are two words for tea, and depending on how you got your tea, you use one or the other. Tea was for very long a monopoly of China. So obviously you’d use the Chinese word for it back home, because there simply wasn’t a word for it in your own language. And the word you used depended on where you went to get the stuff!

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
About this Entry
kodama
[User Picture Icon]
From:allaboutweather
Date:January 14th, 2018 11:57 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
For a while I wanted to drive for Google Maps. It'd be really cool to do!
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:fub
Date:January 17th, 2018 09:01 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
I mean, the result is pretty cool, but the driving itself might be quite boring. Imagine having to zig-zag through uninspiring residential neighbourhoods all day...
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:allaboutweather
Date:January 18th, 2018 03:56 am (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
It depends on where you go. They sometimes go to some far-off places.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:tabular_rasa
Date:January 15th, 2018 02:03 am (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
I shared the one about tea on my Facebook earlier; I thought that was a fascinating insight! (Though one friend was able to think of an example that wasn't either; apparently in Polish tea is called "herbata," which makes me think that they probably already had a word for herbal tea or tisane and tea just fell into that category by the time it arrived?).
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:fub
Date:January 17th, 2018 09:04 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
Oh, that's interesting about the Polish word. I think it indeed decomposes into 'herba' (herb) and 'thea', to form something like 'herb tea'.
There's another one that's different that you know of: we're pretty sure tea arrived in Japan over sea, and yet they use 'cha'.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:lisa_thecat
Date:January 15th, 2018 05:32 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
Interesting link about tea. In Romanian the word is "ceai" pronounced "chai" so it's of Indian origin.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:fub
Date:January 17th, 2018 09:07 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
Probably through Turkey or Russia.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:ashmedai
Date:January 16th, 2018 08:16 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
As a tea fanatic, I especially enjoyed the article about the etymology of the word "tea".
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:fub
Date:January 17th, 2018 09:06 pm (UTC)
(Permanent Link)
It's that nice intersection between language and cartography, and it all makes perfect sense.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture Icon]
From:nucleosides
Date:January 18th, 2018 02:14 am (UTC)
(Permanent Link)

I remember the good old days when Jason used to pore over Google Earth on his iPad (the app version of it), heh. :P

(Reply) (Thread)