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Apr. 1st, 2011 @ 09:05 pm Printing press pics
Current Mood: mellowmellow
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I'll just post some of the nice photos that klik made from the whole printing stuff!

The press

The press: an Adana eight-five.


Ink goes on the disc on top. When you press the handle, the rollers go over the disc (which turns to get an even coat) and are inked that way. Then they roll over the thing-to-be-printed and finally the paper (which is placed on the brown paper) is pressed onto that. The iron thing in between is there to ensure the paper doesn't stick to the inked plates.


Another pic outside, better lighting there.


The workshop of Hans Jacobi, with his Adana in the foreground -- mine's in the back. His press is a bit newer: it has some plastic parts that are metal on mine. He also has a small third roller to roll out the ink more evenly.

The letters

Close-up of the pack of letters. This is the 14pt Roos Romein.


Gracia on top and to the right. I think the left bottom one is Rondo.


More close-ups of Gracia.


As you can see, some of these letters never saw ink!

Storage

Letters stored in a small plastic container with dividers...


Which themselves are stored in a case...


With markers to show what's where.
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From:crustycurmudgeo
Date:April 1st, 2011 08:45 pm (UTC)
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That all looks familiar. Nearly fifty years ago one of my 'trade' classes was in printing. We had a couple of floor standing presses, operated by a by hand cranked flywheel. The flywheel kept the press going while the printer 1) snatched out the printed sheet 2) put in the new sheet 3) tuned and made another turn on the hand crank. We repeated until the job was done or time to re-ink the plate.

We had many type cabinets plus the facilities to mold more. That was why the type metal was lead, tin and antimony. It would melt at a low temp and expand slightly when it cooled in the type mold. That way the edges were sharp and well defined. We were taught that when a print job used up too many of a character, the printer would melt some of his least often used ones or damaged ones to pour in the molds. Recycling!
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From:fub
Date:April 2nd, 2011 03:57 pm (UTC)
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We were taught that when a print job used up too many of a character, the printer would melt some of his least often used ones or damaged ones to pour in the molds. Recycling!
There's a machine (the Intertype) that can be used to produce a whole line of text, using forms in a cartridge of a specific font. When you're printed the line, you'd wipe off the ink and melt the lead down again to be used again. Obviously, I don't have a machine like that, but there's video of one here.

Printing has changed a lot in those fifty years. The lead letters are more of a curiosity to be kept by old pensioners...
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From:egraaf
Date:April 1st, 2011 08:46 pm (UTC)
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The press looks really elegant, very pretty. What size paper can you print with it?
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From:fub
Date:April 2nd, 2011 03:58 pm (UTC)
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The chase is 8 x 5 inches, which is slightly thinner than A5.
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