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Aug. 18th, 2019 @ 08:00 am RPGaDAY 18
Current Mood: embarrassedembarrassed
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#18: Plenty
I keep buying RPGs that I think are interesting, but I do have to admit that I have enough RPGs to last me for… quite some time. But I simply enjoy reading different mechanics and different viewpoints! It’s basically an embarassement of riches…

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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azumanga
Aug. 17th, 2019 @ 12:46 pm RPGaDAY 16 & 17
Current Mood: okayokay
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If I had my way, I’d be playing Breath of the Wild just 24/7. It’s the same kind of experience I had with Skyrim: behind every corner there’s something to find, there are all kinds of small stories to discover…
Anyway, let’s catch up with RPGaDAY!

#16: Dream
Dream sequences of a character are a powerful way for the GM to give information to the players. But they have to be used in moderation, because the novelty wears off quickly: ‘dream logic’ is different from ‘game logic’, and as a player I always get annoyed when I can’t interact with things in the game in the way the game intended. So the idea is to use them sparingly, also to preserve their dramatic effect.
I think I’ve used a dream sequence only once, in a scenario based on Tanith Lee’s “Companions on the Road” — the book has a powerful dream sequence too, and when I used that on a player, they got shivers when they discovered what it meant…

#17: One
The one thing that would make my RPG’ing life better (ok, maybe one of the things…) then that would be a semi-local RPG convention that was fully scheduled and that offered a diverse set of games to play with a diverse set of people. I’ve been to a few Ambercons, and I always enjoyed those, but then we sort-of drifted away from the Amber DRPG — and the timing (a weekend in July, which constrains vacation planning) and the costs added up.
But if there was a con that I could reasonably drive to, with a schedule that you could book for in advance, then that’s certainly something I’d be interested in…

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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kitty tongue
Aug. 15th, 2019 @ 07:51 pm RPGaDAY 14 & 15
Current Mood: pensivepensive
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Yesterday the Nintendo Switch I ordered came in, so I had to spend the whole evening sitting on the couch, running around Hyrule. I’m sure you understand. So you’re getting a little catch-up post today.

#14: Guide
One of the most enjoyable things is to introduce curious people to RPGs. I make no secret of my love for RPGs, so when someone who knows me is interested, I hope it’s easy for them to talk to me about it. Most became curious after seeing the act of playing RPGs portrayed in popular media (Big Bang Theory, Stranger Things, etc). Of course, it doesn’t take much to get me to talk about RPGs…
If they’re still curious after hearing me talk, I will offer to run a game for them. Sometimes the logistics make that difficult and I direct them to organised play initiatives that are local to them — though to be honest I am hesitant to do this, as I do not know how welcoming their local community is. And if the first experience is bad, then that sours the whole activity, even though they could enjoy it with the right group!
So I have been running games for interesting newbies. Some people jump right into the story and are deliciously receptive to the adventure, which I seriously enjoy. Some people need a bit more nudging, but that’s okay too, of course. And sometimes, some of those people find a local group, and they end up playing a lot of RPGs.
I love being a guide to RPGs for people.

#15: Door
Doors are, of course, a feature of many dungeons. Standard protocol is to check for sounds from behind the door, and then open it if it seems like the room beyond is empty. (Or to storm inside with weapons drawn if that is not the case, of course.)
But it’s also a way to obscure what is behind them. Unscrupulous GMs have used this to ensure that the players get to a certain encounter, no matter what choice they make: no matter which door of many they would have picked, all of them would have led to that certain encounter. This takes away free choice, and sounds like ‘railroading’ (a term used to describe an RPG where the characters do not have any possibility of changing the pre-determined plot, which has a deservedly bad reputation), while giving the players the illusion of choice. This is quite the debate: can you put all of your cool stuff in the path of the characters, or are you taking away the essential nature of RPGs by denying the players meaningful choices? And does it even matter if the players never find out?

I’m not so sure on what side I fall in this debate. In principle, I’m all for giving the players meaningful choices. On the other hand, I recognise that many players (me included) play RPGs to experience an exciting story.
Take, for instance, the movie Raiders of the Lost Ark. The hero is, of course, Indiana Jones. But have you ever noticed that he has absolutely no influence on what happens? It’s true: he can’t prevent the nazi’s from getting the Ark. He can’t prevent them taking it on their submarine to their secret base, and he can’t prevent them from opening it. In fact, if he had not been there, things would have progressed exactly as they did with him trying (unsuccessfully) to interfere. Does that mean he didn’t have a grandiose adventure?

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Kashira? Kashira? Gozonji Kashira?
Aug. 13th, 2019 @ 08:03 pm RPGaDAY 13
Current Mood: excitedexcited
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#13: Mystery
Oh no, I totally covered this topic in my entry about Examine!

But I will add to this that you can have a mystery in a non-investigative scenario, and that it will add to the experience. Even if you’re a group of scoundrels fighting for territory to sell your drugs, it is fun to not know how the rival gang gets their drugs, how they transport it to the sale location and why it’s so similar to your own stuff. It’s not an investigative scenario (the goal is not to find out ‘whodunnit’), but having this (admittedly thin) layer of mystery adds to the situation and, crucially, gives the players multiple avenues to take as their next step, which allows the GM to show them more of the setting and what’s going on. And that is awesome!

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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nixie
Aug. 12th, 2019 @ 07:30 pm RPGaDAY 12
Current Mood: pensivepensive
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#12: Friendship
It is true that it’s good to play with friends, but as with any geeky activity, the Five Geek Social Fallacies are always a possibility. It is why I do not commit to long-term games with strangers, and games of a few sessions need to be with people vetted by friends first.
That last category is pretty interesting: I once played in a campaign where I liked the other players well enough, but the majority of them were not (and did not become) friends. That’s also kinda liberating: you only have to play with them, and that’s it then. That means that you also never get to develop behavioural patterns outside of the game that carry over into the game, so you get a very ‘clean’ experience. There are no expectations, so you can concentrate on the game itself. It’s also why I enjoyed going to Ambercons: you’re gaming with total strangers (though you get to meet several people again when you go next year!), which means you get to cut through all the mundane things that happen around the game and concentrate on the game itself.
(As an aside: I’m wondering if there is a market for a fully scheduled RPG convention — like Ambercon, but maybe not focused on a single game? I’d certainly be interested.)

That being said, playing RPGs has allowed me to forge the best relationships in my adult life. I hear people complain that it’s hard to make new friends once you’re an adult and kind of ‘set in a trajectory’. My advice is: play RPGs, and use one-shots to feel out who’s a good fit for you! And you get to play a game as an added bonus, too!

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Viking!
Aug. 11th, 2019 @ 02:37 pm RPGaDAY 11
Current Mood: curiouscurious
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#11: Examine
In an RPG, the GM is the ‘interface’ between the player and the fiction — that is, the player has to rely on the GM to describe what their character is experiencing. This is the most frequent cause for misunderstandings: if the GM doesn’t describe a certain detail and the player doesn’t explicitly ask, then that detail goes unexamined, even if the character would immediately zoom in on that. I’ve been in sessions where, further down the line, a detail turned out to be crucial, a player asked the GM why they didn’t mention it, and the GM replied that they didn’t ask, and thus it was not described.
This is an important reason why investigative scenarios are so hard to do right: where a detective would immediately notice details that seem ‘off’ to them when walking into a room, it befalls to the GM to minutely describe everything so that the player may zoom in on the things that interest them in order to get clues. But players are not detectives, so they might just as easily focus on the wrong things too! One way to ‘solve’ this is to let the players roll their characters’ skill, but of course it’s not satisfying to find the culprit through a dry series of rolls.
The Gumshoe system is designed to get around this. I’ve played a scenario of Bookhounds of London, which uses the system, and I still don’t understand how it’s supposed to work…

While there will be mystery in the games I run, I do not run purely investigative scenarios for this reason. And a nice way to circumvent the issue with descriptions is to give the players part-time authorship of details in the fiction. I’d ask questions like “How did you notice that X has happened here?” or “Did you ever encounter a similar situation? How was that resolved?”, which allows the players to “invent” details that their characters picked up on. Most players really love this, and it makes for better games.

For reference, here are the questions again:

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Glowing LED
Aug. 10th, 2019 @ 01:55 pm RPGaDAY 10
Current Mood: lazylazy
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#10: Focus
Some time ago, I noticed that as a player, I tend to focus on the plot of the game. It’s why I play RPGs: I want to experience the adventure! This has two consequences.
One is that I do not do well in purely character-driven games. I can’t sit around and talk in-character for a whole session: my character will have a motivation (they want to make something happen), and will formulate and execute plans to get what they want. I’ve stepped out of campaigns that were super-interesting but did not offer a lot of ‘structure’ for my character to move ahead.
The second is that my characters tend to focus on the mission. I tend to take notes, and it has happened more than once that the rest of the group sort-of wanders off in pursuit of whatever, and my character had to pull them back together and point them towards the (often time-critical!) issue at hand. I’ve tried to move away from that — deliberately play characters that would not be considered the party leader, for instance. But somehow, whatever I do, I end up playing the character with the focus anyway. Maybe I shouldn’t fight it, and just go with the flow.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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hand-eye coordination
Aug. 9th, 2019 @ 07:38 pm RPGaDAY 9
Current Mood: hopefulhopeful
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#9: Critical
Most rulesets have rules for critical successes and critical failures. Based on the die rolls, things can work out really bad or really good. Most dice mechanics have higher rates of criticals than “real life”, but then again, RPGs offer a larger-than-life experience, and things going epically good or bad are a large part of that.
There are a lot of ‘war stories’ from critical dice results, as those moments allow for over-the-top results — I still remember some criticals from two decades ago, because they pushed the narrative into unexpected directions. It’s no coincidence that there are memes for critical failures and for critical successes!
Interestingly enough, one of my favourite rulesets, the Powered by the Apocalypse rules, does not have criticals. And for some reason, I never missed them in those games. I think this is because the actions of the characters are much less ‘restrained’ than in ‘traditional’ rulesets, so you get crazy antics anyway.

There is another type of critical: critical thinking about RPGs and the stories that are told. I love that the roleplaying public is diversifying — or at least, the RPG players who are not white dudes get more visibility. RPGs have, for a long time, catered exclusively to white (teenage) dudes, and that has proven to be problematic. Now companies are explicitly diversifying their artwork, their games, and their public. I think that’s great: with more diverse voices, we get more diverse viewpoints and more diverse games!
This critical lens towards RPGs are, could and should be, also improves my own thinking, because I want to do better too. I’m going to call out @POCGamer — I’ve written about his thoughts on ‘Outsider Resolution Bias’ before, and today I read an article from him about Decolonization and Integration in D&D, which certainly broadened my horizon in thinking about games and settings.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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D20
Aug. 8th, 2019 @ 06:29 pm RPGaDAY 8
Current Mood: melancholymelancholy
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#8: Obscure
Playing RPGs as a hobby was pretty obscure back in the day, but I’m glad it’s becoming less so these days. Or maybe it is still obscure, but the geeky media that I’m attuned to has taken a shine to Dungeons & Dragons these past years. Certainly the release of 5th edition did a lot to pull in new crowds and generate media attention! I’m glad this is the case, because it enables more people to discover the joy of RPGs!

As for obscure RPGs… I think the most obscure RPG I have in my collection is Darkurthe Legends, a so-called “fantasy heartbreaker“. I participated in the playtest with a group, which is how I ended up with the book.
I also had a T-shirt from the playtest, with a horned skull on the front and the cities where the “World Tour” went (everywhere there was a playtest group). For years, people thought this was of a really obscure hardrock group… Sadly, the T-shirt disintegrated through repeated wear and I had to throw it out.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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hand-eye coordination
Aug. 7th, 2019 @ 06:21 pm RPGaDAY 7
Current Mood: okayokay
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#7: Familiar
Some gamers insist on playing only games that they are familiar with. I’m not sure I understand that mentality — I’m a bit of an omnivore with respect to gaming. Finding out how a game works, what kind of stories are told, and how the rules support that — that’s part of the fun for me. And the kind of game you get when playing, say, Blades in the Dark, is totally different than when you’re playing Dungeons & Dragons. Why would you limit your experiences like that?

When I’m playing a Ranger, Druid or Wizard, I sometimes get to pick an animal as familiar. In my experience, the familiar doesn’t really play a large role in the adventure, other than to scout ahead (if it’s a bird) or to pick something from a narrow space (if it’s something like a rat). As a result, I don’t pay it a lot of attention.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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azumanga
Aug. 6th, 2019 @ 07:52 pm RPGaDAY 6
Current Mood: pensivepensive
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#6: Ancient

Many RPGs have ancient… ‘things’… out there that the characters encounter and have to deal with. Most notably, of course, dungeons from a lost civilisation, filled with wondrous artefacts. I had wondered before how it would be possible for the locals to simply forget large parts of what the previous inhabitants left behind, but then I realised that we have models for this in real life too. All it takes is an event where most inhabitants are displaced — such as after the sacking of Rome, when the Forum was basically dismantled to serve as building material for new houses. So it’s not that unlikely as it first seemed to me.
I’ve written about that in this entry.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Viking!
Aug. 5th, 2019 @ 07:12 pm RPGaDAY 5
Current Mood: calmcalm
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#5: Space
Reading the other answers to this question, there seem to be three interpretations of this term, and I’m going to answer for all three of them.

The first is ‘space’ as in: outer space. I’ve never played much sci-fi RPGs — and the ones I did play did not ‘feel’ very sci-fi. Mostly, space is merely a backdrop for the adventure, and you don’t have to deal with all the iffy aspects of travelling through space. Most recently, I’ve played Star Trek Adventures — I’m not even counting Star Wars, because that’s more fantasy than sci-fi.
Something like Transhuman Space would be fun to get to the table, because there the vastness of space is the whole point of the setting, but I don’t know anybody who would run it. And my priorities for games to run myself lie elsewhere.

The second is ‘space’ as in: the physical space. I used to do a lot of gaming at friends’ homes, but that has largely been replaced by playing online — using Roll20 for character sheets and dice rolls; and (mostly) Zoom for video chat. Which means I tend to play at my desk, with all the comforts that are available there.

The third is ‘space’ as in: metaphorical space. It used to be that I wanted to hear myself talk, because I thought I had Things To Say — both in and out of games. I’ve mellowed out quite a bit with age (like you do), and I quite enjoy listening to the antics of the other players. I do not crave the role of a leader, and I enjoy giving others the space to explore the game and their characters.
There’s one thing that I have not been able to shake. If there is some kind of plot, then I will stay on-track and will try to keep the others on-track as well. I don’t know what it is, but I’ve had multiple campaigns where the whole group looked at me to tell them what should happen next. Even if I try not to take on that role in a group, I somehow end up doing it anyway.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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D20
Aug. 4th, 2019 @ 07:46 pm RPGaDAY catchup
Current Mood: mellowmellow
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For the sixth year running, there is another RPGaDAY month in August! This year, instead of a set of concrete questions, there’s a single term for each day, and it is up to the respondents to interpret that term and tell something about how they experienced RPGs in a way that is related to that term.
You can see the full announcement here.

What with business travel, recuperating from that, visiting a festival and recuperating from that, I only now have the time to sit down and post my answers. So today you’re getting a catch-up post! I’ll try to do a single entry for each day from now on, but we’ll see how that works out.

#1: First
My first RPG was Rolemaster, what is now called the ‘classic’ edition. In the fall vacation of my 14th year, a boy from school told me he was going to run RPGs at his house every day, and he told me that it would be right up my alley. Turned out he was right! I was given the ‘easiest’ character to play, a Hobbit Thief (of course), and with a crew of adventurers we set out to solve the mystery of Minas Anghen, the first adventure of the Haunted Ruins of the Dunlendings Middle-Earth module.
For years, Rolemaster would be my go-to Fantasy RPG, and it would take me years before I’d even play Dungeons & Dragons, because it just wasn’t a factor in my immediate gaming circles. TO be fair, my teenage self even looked down on D&D, since it lacked the skill-based customisation options that were baked into Rolemaster. At least that was ‘rectified’ by D&D’s 3rd edition (which came at a time when nobody was playing Rolemaster anymore), and even taken to the extreme with Pathfinder…

#2: Unique
D&D and its direct descendants promote a mode of play that is sometimes derisively called ‘murder-hobo’: the adventuring party is a group of exceptional outsiders that roams the wilds, killing and looting as they go, without too much connection to the places they visit. Over time, attempts have been made to circumvent this mode of play and make D&D games something different — with varying success. Still the XP requirements of D&D steer towards murder-hobo’ing.
In Ryuutama, the players are ‘normal’ people (craftspeople, farmers, healers, hunters, etc) that go on a long, extended trip — there is a justification for it in the setting. And while there are combat rules (that are expected to be used), the focus is not on killing monsters and taking their stuff, but on experiencing the trip. Instead of gaining XP for killing things, in Ryuutama you get XP for travelling! This mode of play takes the murder out of the hobo’ing, and that is pretty unique for a game that features extended travel.
And because it’s a Japanese game (it has been translated to English, French and Spanish), it has a unique flavour to it, too.

#3: Engage
The very point of RPGs is to play it with a group of people. Together, you create ‘the fiction’ (as the Apocalypse World Engine calls it), and interact with that through the rules. This means engaging with the GM and the other players, but also with the resulting story. The stereotype of the antisocial gamer can’t exist in RPGs, because to play an RPG you will have to play with others.

#4: Share
When klik was at her retreat, I started writing a Macross-inspired RPG. I didn’t get too far, and all the good parts are based on the text of Blades in the Dark or Monsterhearts II — all the bad parts are my own… I’ll just share how far I got before the week ended. I will revisit it and continue work on it, when I have more time.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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D20
Jul. 31st, 2019 @ 08:39 pm Passing as a native
Current Mood: pensivepensive

I’m again in Denmark for a few days, to visit our office there. It is very interesting to be somewhere where people automatically assume I’m a native and start talking to me in a language that I can’t understand at all. When I react in English, most are visibly taken aback, which is kind of fun but also adds unnecessary confusion to the interactions.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Ships passing in the night
Jul. 18th, 2019 @ 08:37 am Kitty cuddles
Current Mood: lovedloved
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Last Sunday, I dropped klik off at her sesshin. As usual, I’ve taken the week off work too, so I’m mostly home doing my own thing (and leaving the house for the occasional Pokemon Go raid…)
This means I get to spend much more time with the kitties than usual, so I get more kitty cuddles than usual!


Yuzu climbed up on my desk (it was at standing height) for an intensive cuddle session, insisting on licking my fingers and forehead…
(Also, I wish I could take better pictures of her, because she’s so pretty. But her fur is too dark in most circumstances, and she can’t sit still at all other times…)


Late-night cuddles with Mikan on the couch.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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kitty tongue
Jul. 17th, 2019 @ 08:11 pm Middle-aged kitties
Current Mood: lovedloved
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These two kitties turned seven years old a month ago! I think that means they’re middle-aged now — at least, there is special food for cats of 7+ of age, so I think that means they’ve crossed some kind of ‘milestone’. But apart from Mikan (the one in the back) having had some dental work done, they still don’t show any signs of slowing down!

(I took this photo when I came back from a Pokemon Go raid on the gym behind our house.)

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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3-eyed cat
Jul. 9th, 2019 @ 08:34 pm Some RPG design thinking
Current Mood: pensivepensive
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Almost all mecha games are stat/skill-based and have a single skill for something like mecha piloting. Which means that every pilot character will have the same stats to maximise their performance in combat. After all, if Agility is the most important stat for piloting a mech, and you play a mecha pilot, of course Agility will have to be your highest stat. I have the same beef with PbtA games. Yes, there is niche protection from the playbooks, but every playbook tends to operate on one or maybe two stats — so every character for that playbook has maximised those two stats and it’s always the same.

Perrin’s Mecha had a way to break through that: linking pilot stats with mecha ratings. It’s brilliant in its simplicity.

My theory is that there are no more than four things you do in a mech: manoevering, shooting, defending and scanning. And every type of mech has their own features that help with that, like Power, Weapons, Armour and System — a mech with more powerful engines will make it easier to manoever, a mech with more powerful telemetry systems is better at scanning, etc. So every mech will have a rating for each of these four things.
Pilots have four stats too — like Brawn, Agility, Intellect and Willpower. (Not sure that these four will be it, still need to think about that.) And when a pilot enters a type of mech for the first time, they choose which stat to link with which rating for that mech. The idea being that if the pilot links their Brawn with Power, they have a forceful mode of movement in their mech, powering through to get somewhere. Linking Intellect with Power would mean their quick analysis of the battlefield allows them to avoid obstacles and thus move around more quickly. Linking Agility with Power would mean their movement would be fluid, smoothly avoiding obstacles.
This would allow the pilot to use the mech ratings to compensate their weaknesses — but more importantly, it would allow the players to differentiate their pilots stats and skill-wise without sacrificing their performance during missions. And since the game I’ll be writing will also put emphasis on the pilots’ lives outside of the mecha cockpit, that’s important to me.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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UN Spacy
Jul. 5th, 2019 @ 06:28 pm The Project

In just over one week, klik is going on a zen retreat — from Sunday afternoon until Saturday morning. I always take those weeks off work too, because I don’t fancy working all day and then coming home to a house filled with grumpy cats. And most times, I set myself a goal, or a project to work on, so that I have something to show for my week off — instead of simply vegetating behind my computer.
For some time now, I have been looking for an RPG that captures the feel and themes of the Macross anime series — and failing to find one. The recent Robotech/Macross RPG just wasn’t good overall. I have quite a few other mecha RPGs in my library, but most of those are rather one-dimensional and lack the background structure of mecha pilots being part of both the military and society.

So my Project for that week will be to write a Macross-inspired RPG. I have been doing research for a bit, and I have some design goals and ideas on how to hit those. The end goal would be to be able to playtest a skirmish on Friday.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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SD Fub
Jun. 29th, 2019 @ 09:12 pm Casual raid trains
Current Mood: chipperchipper
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Today in Pokemon Go, from 16:00 for three hours, the Legendary Pokemon Raikou was in raids in every Gym. This is not new — it’s been in raids and even in the weekly field research breakthroughs, but from today it can actually be shiny! Shiny Pokemon have a variant colour scheme and are extra-rare, but it doesn’t have any game effects. And since it was a special Raid Day, you’d get five free raid passes today, instead of the usual one. With a pass you could have saved from yesterday, that would mean you could do six raids for free.
What with the release of a new shiny Pokemon, the raid fever was running high with the usual suspects. Plans were made to visit all the gyms in the neighbourhood and far and wide outside of that, going by car and bicycle. I’ve done a few of those raids, and I don’t like the high pace: there’s no time to properly catch the Pokemon after the raid because you have to go to the next, resulting in irresponsible driving and a general feeling of stress.
I don’t need more stress in my life, so I wanted to do a raid train with the other ‘casuals’: just six raids (or maybe more if people wanted to invest the paid raid passes), and we’d simply walk from gym to gym. There are four EX raid gyms in our neighbourhood, and we’d visit three of them on the route that I designed. We got enough casuals to make it viable, so at 16:00 we set off.

At our second gym, just as we were finishing up, a boy of 14 years old comes ambling up and asks us if we were playing Pokemon Go, and whether he could tag along with us? Of course, that wasn’t a problem, and our little raid group gained a member. Two raids later, a friend of his turns up, and we gained a second member. And just as we were walking towards the sixth gym, we passed a boy helping his mother unloading groceries from the car. Apparently he knew our two new members, and when they told him they were going to do another Raikou raid, he got really excited and wanted to come too. A minute later, he turns up with his mothers’ phone (because his own phone apparently didn’t have “outside internet”). Second raid he did (our seventh and last), he even got a shiny!
We didn’t get any shinies this time, but it was a lot of fun to see the enthusiasm of these boys as they got to raid with us — something they otherwise would not have been able to do. It was a lot of fun, and we ended up at the gym behind our house, so we said goodbye and went home. An afternoon well spent.

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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Glowing LED
Jun. 21st, 2019 @ 06:53 pm Friday Five
Current Mood: blahblah

1. How do you beat the summer heat?
Here in the Netherlands, what qualifies as “summer heat” is something different than what it is in, say, Australia. Our living room faces the north, so our extension is in the shade of the house during the hottest hours, so that helps. And when it cools off in the evening, we open the hatch in the extension and open the windows in the attic, creating a ‘chimney’ through which hot air is expelled at the top and cool air taken in below.

2. Do you have air conditioning?
At the office and in my car, but not in the house.

3. What’s your idea of the perfect summer day?
Sunny, about 25 degrees Celcius, with a light breeze. To make it even more ideal would be if I have the day off and can go somewhere fun with klik.

4. What’s one thing you always seem to do every summer whether you want to or not?
I’m not sure I have specific summer activities that are always on the menu?

5. Are you ready for the summer?
I don’t have a set of preparations for summer, so… I guess?

Crossposted from my blog. Comment here or at the original post.
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azumanga